Tag Archives: Emily O’Neill

Our 2015 Best of the Net Nominees Are…

Our nominations for the 2015 Best of the Net anthology, which honors literary work that originally appeared on the internet between 7/1/2014 & 6/30/2015, are:

“ARG” – Anthony Michael Morena (short fiction)
“Street Music” – Emily O’Neill (poetry)
“Invocation: Joan of Arc Reads the Crowd” – Jennifer MacBain-Stephens (poetry)
“9 lessons in witchcraft” – Danielle Perry (poetry)
“The Rud Yard” – Vajra Chandrasekera (short fiction)

Congratulations & best of luck to all our nominees, as well as our eternal gratitude for contributing their amazing work to our weird little zine.

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FLAPPERHOUSE : Year One

Coming soon in soft, pulpy paperback.
Stay tuned…FY1F&BCs

 

Outside the Flapperhouse – 12.30.2014

As 2014 has been careening through its homestretch, our Flappers have been even more prolific than usual, getting their work published across the internet like there won’t be a 2015.

Jeff Laughlin shared some things he’s learned this year in “The Year I Didn’t Belong” over at Triad City Beat.

Mari Ness’ “Offgrid” popped up at Three-Lobed Burning Eye.

Dusty Wallace’s “Flight of the Lonely” went up at Acidic Fiction.

Samantha Eliot Stier’s “Plugs” was inserted into The Writing Disorder.

Juliet Cook & j/j hastain collaborated on “Clots Push Over the Edge” for the latest issue of Stirring.

Alison McBain’s playfully absurd “Nothing For Sale” was featured at Saturday Night Reader.

Ed Ahern left his “Aftertaste” at New Pop Lit.

Anna Lea Jancewicz’s poem “Black Robin” nested at Spry Lit.

Cassandra de Alba’s poem “Tyra Banks in the Arctic Circle” strutted the runway at Glitter Mob.

Mila Jaroniec joined drDOCTOR for their year-end podcast.

Emily O’Neill’s poem “Proof” was included in the latest edition of Sundog Lit.

Natalia Theodoridou’s “The Ravens’ Sister” perched itself at The Kenyon Review Online.

J.E. Reich wrote about embracing the changing Jewish family for The Jewish Daily Forward.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s “Sleepers” went up at Fantastic Stories of the Imagination.

Julie C. Day’s “Faerie Medicine,” which initially appeared in FLAPPERHOUSE #2, was reprinted by Luna Station Quarterly.

“Year of the Horse” – Poetry by Emily O’Neill

Head of a Horse - Alexander Orlowski, 1821
Head of a Horse – Alexander Orlowski, 1821

2014 is the “Year of the Horse,”  and Emily O’Neill‘s poem of the same name (included in our Fall 2014 issue) has some strongly-worded things to say about eating these kind-faced creatures.

{ X }

I’M NOT INTERESTED IN HOW TO BREAK
a horse because what’s uglier
is whether you would eat one.

Not alone in the dessert
staring down saguaros, dying
at the hands of your own stupidity.

Would you eat one for dinner
just to say you’ve done it?  Could you
look into its kind, unknowing face,

scoop out the crude oil eyes, & carve
flank into a rain of steaks to last
until your next success?  When

what carries you has been devoured
what will hold you until you’re away?
If tendon tangles in your teeth

I hope it tastes like trampled grass.
I hope you see daybreak as a monster.
I hope your hands stay chapped and red

for as long as it takes guilt to grow
into a shaded place hung with honey
hives where the bees sting without asking

what meat you are made of, or if
you might rot in the heat of the day.

{ X }

IMG_1535EMILY O’NEILL is a writer, artist, and proud Jersey girl. Her recent poems and stories can be found inElectric Cereal, Gigantic Sequins, and Split Rock Review, among others. Her debut collection,Pelican, is the inaugural winner of Yes Yes Books’ Pamet River Prize and forthcoming in 2014. You can pick her brain at http://emily-oneill.com.

“reflect / refract” – Poetry by Emily O’Neill

5th Pentacle of Mars (Devil's Trap from The Key of Solomon)
5th Pentacle of Mars (Devil’s Trap from The Key of Solomon)

Emily O’Neill gets Supernatural in “reflect  / refract,” one of the 5 poems she contributed to our Fall 2014 issue.

{ X }

PAINT ME SILVER
with power / let mine be the mouth
to echo all of it back / no praying,
no Devil’s Traps drawn in yellow
chalk / keep your scorpions, your virgin
blood above the door, that Latin
compulsion to leave the body
behind un-cursed /

                                              I don’t speak any holy
tongue / in it my name means mirror / call me
the rain / I’ll make puddles, each puddle a leak
towards the future / in the desert even
the rocks bloom to greet rain / let everything
kiss me that way / let death twist
back around itself like a moonflower / let the moon
drop like a pebble into my mouth /

forgive me / I’ll crawl up your shirtfront to lick the salt
there /  bang bang / call me cured / the only true trap
door out of any ritual is death / the mantra to chant—no fear
without flying, without falling,
without a haunting

                                                          where there’s a cliff
there’s a chasm / then a chill / then a voice shouting back
each secret born from your lips & dropped
into the barren dark

{ X }

IMG_1535EMILY O’NEILL is a writer, artist, and proud Jersey girl. Her recent poems and stories can be found in Electric Cereal, Gigantic Sequins, and Split Rock Review, among others. Her debut collection, Pelican, is the inaugural winner of Yes Yes Books’ Pamet River Prize and forthcoming in 2014. You can pick her brain at http://emily-oneill.com.

“Pentacost” – Poetry by Emily O’Neill

calligraffiti_of_fire.400
Calligraffiti of Fire – Brion Gysin, 1986

One of the 5 poems by Emily O’Neill in our Fall 2014 issue is “Pentacost,” a song of towering flame and ghostly visions.

{ X }

I WAS TOO YOUNG WHEN THE HOUSE CAUGHT FIRE TO RUN.

I hid in the bathtub, a tower of flame
around me as the shower curtain turned ash
& the ash undressed itself & kissed my skin & the porcelain
grew warm as a sun-baked river stone. Ghosts are the only city I’ve seen

since childhood. They stand straighter than buildings, sigh
louder than a house settling in the suburbs. Ghosts have street between them
we call space and airports we call hauntings where they take off & land
in, on, & around us, disturbing all our night rituals. A bath will never
warm my bones the way the oven can, so I crawl inside & leave

the front door wide.  No guests beyond the dead
come to stay. I’ve been burying letters in the mud
because rivers cannot close their ears

when someone is weeping. The bathroom is the only temple
I have left.  I press my face to the honeycomb floor, waiting

quiet for the dead & their backwards sun come to swallow every day
into its slippery heat; waiting for the hive to drop.
for the whole swarm to sting me.

{ X }

IMG_1535EMILY O’NEILL is a writer, artist, and proud Jersey girl. Her recent poems and stories can be found in Electric Cereal, Gigantic Sequins, and Split Rock Review, among others. Her debut collection, Pelican, is the inaugural winner of Yes Yes Books’ Pamet River Prize and forthcoming in 2014. You can pick her brain at http://emily-oneill.com.

Outside the Flapperhouse – 11.12.2014

These past few weeks, our Flappers have been killing it all over the web with their literary weaponry: 

Natalia Theodoridou’s fantastic short story “The Eleven Holy Numbers of the Mechanical Soul” was posted at Clarkesworld.

Nerve published J.E. Reich’s autobiographical essay “I Filmed a Sex Scene Before the Reddit Era.”

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s poem “Kites” appeared in the “Summer Is Dead” issue of Goblin Fruit.

Joseph Tomaras spoke with Nick Mamatas about Joseph’s story “Thirty-Eight Observations on the Nature of the Self,” which is featured in the Phantasm Japan anthology.

Jeff Laughlin mused about sports on the radio for Triad City Beat.

Rebecca Ann Jordan spooked readers with her horror story “Collection” at Fiction Vortex.

Gigantic Sequins added Emily O’Neill’s poem “de Los Muertos” to their online archives.

Julie C. Day’s story “Ghost Bubbles” popped up at Bartleby Snopes.

J. Bradley recorded a reading of “A Love Poem as Written by Robert Rodriguez,” included in the first issue of  Profane.