Tag Archives: Cassandra de Alba

And Our Most-Viewed Pieces of 2015 Were…

The False Mirror - Rene Magritte, 1928
The False Mirror – Rene Magritte, 1928

Nearly twice as many eyeballs gazed upon our website in 2015 than in 2014, and now we shall countdown the 5 pieces which attracted the most of those eyeballs this past year:

#5. “A Deer With the Head of Emily Dickinson” by Cassandra de Alba, a deliciously eerie poem which will also appear in Cassandra’s forthcoming chapbook of deer-centric poems published by Horse Less Press.

#4. “The Rud Yard” by Vajra Chandrasekera, a hilariously terrifying take on the future of the surveillance state, which we nominated for both a Pushcart Prize & the Best of the Net.

#3. “Gelid” by T. Mazzara, our Fiction Editor’s touching prose poem for a departed friend.

#2. “Earth Comes Down” by Maria Pinto, a bluesy slipstream story with an impressive second-place finish, considering we posted it to our site less than 3 months ago.

and the #1 most-viewed piece on our site for 2015 was “9 lessons in witchcraft” by Danielle Perry (another Best of the Net nominee), which vastly increased our cult following among the occult.

Congratulations to Cassandra, Vajra, Mazzara, Maria, and Danielle, and thanks for all the eyeballs!

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“Half-Price Wednesday” – Poetry by Cassandra de Alba

Feet of an Apostle - Albrecht Dürer, circa 1508
Feet of an Apostle – Albrecht Dürer, circa 1508

“Half-Price Wednesday”, one of three pieces by Cassandra de Alba in our Winter 2015 issue, may be a very tiny poem but it gives us some awfully big shivers.

{ X }

THREE WEEKS AFTER YOUR GRANDMOTHER DIED
in these boots I bought them at Salvation Army
for the change in my back pocket. Wore them casual
with paint-stained jeans and dirty sweaters. Wondered
when my fingers started to tremble as I turned pages.
Developed a taste for good gin. Didn’t question
until the morning I woke up without feet.

{ X }

stcCASSANDRA de ALBAs work has appeared in Skydeer Helpking, The Nervous Breakdown, and Vector Press, among other places. She is a grad student in the greater Boston area and can be found online at outsidewarmafghans.tumblr.com

“A deer with the head of Emily Dickinson” – Poetry by Cassandra de Alba

EmilyHeadDeer

Cassandra de Alba‘s “A deer with the head of Emily Dickinson”— one of three deliciously eerie poems she contributed to our Winter 2015 issue— is about a deer with the head of Emily Dickinson.

{ X }

A DEER WITH THE HEAD OF EMILY DICKINSON
has been spotted all over town:
hugging the edge of the forest,
standing fog-shrouded in post-midnight
parking lots, up to its knees
in the river’s slow swirl.
The thing about the deer
with the head of Emily Dickinson
is that no one has ever seen her move –
she is never seen coming or going,
never leaping across the road
like the hundred of deer-headed deer
who haunt our forests –
the deer with the head of Emily Dickinson
is always standing there, stone-still
in the middle distance,
for as long as you care to look.

{ X }

stcCASSANDRA de ALBAs work has appeared in Skydeer Helpking, The Nervous Breakdown, and Vector Press, among other places. She is a grad student in the greater Boston area and can be found online at outsidewarmafghans.tumblr.com

FLAPPERHOUSE : Year One

Coming soon in soft, pulpy paperback.
Stay tuned…FY1F&BCs

 

“Poison House” – Poetry by Cassandra de Alba

haunted-house-1858
Haunted House – Thomas Moran, 1858

Our Winter 2015 Issue is home to a number of wicked buildings– like “Poison House,” one of three deliciously eerie poems contributed by Cassandra de Alba

{ X }

WOOD PANELING SO DARK IT’S ALMOST BLACK.
Vines that grow when your back’s turned,
greedy for more noxious air, the shimmer
of purple-green haze in all these rooms
empty in the middle, edged with low,
plush furniture that might conceal
knives, jeweled cages where snakes
and lizards lie with one eye half-open.
Heavy curtains on the windows,
blood-red velvet you’re afraid to touch.
Old-fashioned light switches,
two buttons, and none of them work.
When you get the nerve
to force a curtain open, you’re greeted
by a wall of foliage against the glass,
stalks and leaves twisting toward you,
away from the sun. A bird
caws once, then goes quiet.
You let the curtain fall back into place.
The noise of the house, silent at first,
seems to grow and grow –
a rumbling whistle like a teakettle
seconds from boil, a clicking
of mandibles or molars, a little voice
that whispers from every corner
all the secrets your loves
thought they’d kept from you.

{ X }

stcCASSANDRA de ALBAs work has appeared in Skydeer Helpking, The Nervous Breakdown, and Vector Press, among other places. She is a grad student in the greater Boston area and can be found online at outsidewarmafghans.tumblr.com

Outside the Flapperhouse – 12.30.2014

As 2014 has been careening through its homestretch, our Flappers have been even more prolific than usual, getting their work published across the internet like there won’t be a 2015.

Jeff Laughlin shared some things he’s learned this year in “The Year I Didn’t Belong” over at Triad City Beat.

Mari Ness’ “Offgrid” popped up at Three-Lobed Burning Eye.

Dusty Wallace’s “Flight of the Lonely” went up at Acidic Fiction.

Samantha Eliot Stier’s “Plugs” was inserted into The Writing Disorder.

Juliet Cook & j/j hastain collaborated on “Clots Push Over the Edge” for the latest issue of Stirring.

Alison McBain’s playfully absurd “Nothing For Sale” was featured at Saturday Night Reader.

Ed Ahern left his “Aftertaste” at New Pop Lit.

Anna Lea Jancewicz’s poem “Black Robin” nested at Spry Lit.

Cassandra de Alba’s poem “Tyra Banks in the Arctic Circle” strutted the runway at Glitter Mob.

Mila Jaroniec joined drDOCTOR for their year-end podcast.

Emily O’Neill’s poem “Proof” was included in the latest edition of Sundog Lit.

Natalia Theodoridou’s “The Ravens’ Sister” perched itself at The Kenyon Review Online.

J.E. Reich wrote about embracing the changing Jewish family for The Jewish Daily Forward.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s “Sleepers” went up at Fantastic Stories of the Imagination.

Julie C. Day’s “Faerie Medicine,” which initially appeared in FLAPPERHOUSE #2, was reprinted by Luna Station Quarterly.